Intake of micronutrients among Danish adult users and non-users of dietary supplements.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2011

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Objectives: To evaluate the intake of micronutrients from the diet and from supplements in users and non-users of dietary supplements, respectively, in a representative sample of the Danish adult population. A specific objective was to identify the determinants of supplement use. Design: A cross-sectional representative national study of the intake of vitamins and minerals from the diet and from dietary supplements. Method: The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity, 2000-2004. Participants (n=4,479; 53% females) aged 18-75 years gave information about the use of dietary supplements in a personal interview. The quantification of the micronutrient contribution from supplements was estimated from a generic supplement constructed from data on household purchases. Nutrient intakes from the diet were obtained from a self-administered 7-day pre-coded dietary record. Median intakes of total nutrients from the diets of users and non-users of supplements were analysed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Sixty percent of females and 51% of males were users of supplements. With the exception of vitamin D, the intake of micronutrients from the diet was adequate at the group level for all age and gender groups. Among females in the age group 18-49 years, the micronutrient intake from the diet was significantly higher compared with the non-users of dietary supplements. The use of dietary supplements increased with age and with ‘intention to eat healthy.’ Conclusion: Intake of micronutrients from the diet alone was considered adequate for both users and nonusers of dietary supplements. Younger females who were supplement users had a more micronutrient-dense diet compared to non-users.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFood & Nutrition Research
Publication date2011
Volume55
IssueSuppl.
ISSN1654-6628
DOIs
StatePublished
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 5

Keywords

  • Food supplements, Vitamins, Adults, Minerals
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