• Author: Freitas, Ana R.

    Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Faculdade de Farmacia

  • Author: Coque, Teresa M.

    Servicio de Microbiología, Instituto Ramon y Cajal de Investigacion Sanitaria

  • Author: Novais, Carla

    Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Faculdade de Farmacia

  • Author: Hammerum, Anette M.

    Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut

  • Author: Lester, Camilla M.

    Department of Microbiological Surveillance and Research, Statens Serum Institut

  • Author: Zervos, Marcus J.

    Henry Ford Health System, Detroit

  • Author: Donabedian, Susan

    Henry Ford Health System, Detroit

  • Author: Jensen, Lars Bogø

    National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

  • Author: Francia, Maria Victoria

    Servicio de Microbiología, Hospital Marque´s de Valdecilla e Instituto de Formacion e Investigacion Marque´s de Valdecilla

  • Author: Baquero, Fernando

    Servicio de Microbiología, Instituto Ramon y Cajal de Investigacion Sanitaria

  • Author: Peixe, Luisa

    Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Faculdade de Farmacia

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VRE isolates from pigs (n = 29) and healthy persons (n = 12) recovered during wide surveillance studies performed in Portugal, Denmark, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States (1995 to 2008) were compared with outbreak/prevalent VRE clinical strains (n = 190; 23 countries; 1986 to 2009). Thirty clonally related Enterococcus faecium clonal complex 5 (CC5) isolates (17 sequence type 6 [ST6], 6 ST5, 5 ST185, 1 ST147, and 1 ST493) were obtained from feces of swine and healthy humans. This collection included isolates widespread among pigs of European Union (EU) countries since the mid-1990s. Each ST comprised isolates showing similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns (≤6 bands difference; >82% similarity). Some CC5 PFGE subtype strains from swine were indistinguishable from hospital vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) causing infections. A truncated variant of Tn1546 (encoding resistance to vancomycin) and tcrB (coding for resistance to copper) were consistently located on 150- to 190-kb plasmids (rep(pLG1)). E. faecium CC17 (ST132) isolates from pig manure and two clinical samples showed identical PFGE profiles and contained a 60-kb mosaic plasmid (rep(Inc18) plus rep(pRUM)) carrying diverse Tn1546-IS1216 variants. The only Enterococcus faecalis isolate obtained from pigs (CC2-ST6) corresponded to a multidrug-resistant clone widely disseminated in hospitals in Italy, Portugal, and Spain, and both animal and human isolates harbored an indistinguishable 100-kb mosaic plasmid (rep(pRE25) plus rep(pCF10)) containing the whole Tn1546 backbone. The results indicate a current intra- and international spread of E. faecium and E. faecalis clones and their plasmids among swine and humans
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Publication date2011
Volume49
Issue3
Pages925-931
ISSN0095-1137
DOIs
StatePublished
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 32
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