Establishing new microbial cell factories for sustainable bioprocesses

Publication: Research - peer-reviewConference abstract in journal – Annual report year: 2012

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Establishing new microbial cell factories for sustainable bioprocesses. / Workman, Mhairi; Holt, Philippe; Liu, Xiaoying .

In: New Biotechnology, Vol. 29S, 2012, p. S75.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewConference abstract in journal – Annual report year: 2012

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Author

Workman, Mhairi; Holt, Philippe; Liu, Xiaoying / Establishing new microbial cell factories for sustainable bioprocesses.

In: New Biotechnology, Vol. 29S, 2012, p. S75.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewConference abstract in journal – Annual report year: 2012

Bibtex

@article{6eb58b88d60247a4ab97865f63a8f1cb,
title = "Establishing new microbial cell factories for sustainable bioprocesses",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
author = "Mhairi Workman and Philippe Holt and Xiaoying Liu",
note = "Poster 1.4.09",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.nbt.2012.08.211",
volume = "29S",
pages = "S75",
journal = "New Biotechnology",
issn = "1871-6784",

}

RIS

TY - ABST

T1 - Establishing new microbial cell factories for sustainable bioprocesses

A1 - Workman,Mhairi

A1 - Holt,Philippe

A1 - Liu,Xiaoying

AU - Workman,Mhairi

AU - Holt,Philippe

AU - Liu,Xiaoying

PB - Elsevier BV

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The demands of modern society are increasing pressure on natural resources while creating the need for a wider range of products. There is an interest in developing bioprocesses to meet these demands, with conversion of a variety of waste materials providing the basis for a sustainable society. The application of biological catalysts which can convert a variety of substrates to an array of<br/>desirable products has been demonstrated in both ancient bioprocesses and modern industrial biotechnology. In recent times, focus has been on a limited number of “model” organisms which have been extensively exploited and developed. Systems biology approaches can be applied with these well studied strains, where considerable physiological data has been obtained, genome sequences are known and genetic tools have been developed. With the necessity of considering a wider array of substrates and the need for new types of products, it may be interesting to look to less domesticated strains and towards more non-conventional hosts in the development of new bioprocesses. This approach demands thorough physiological characterization as well as establishment of tools for genetic engineering if new cell factories are to be exploited through application of systems biology tools. Here two potential cell factories for the conversion of glycerol are described: Pachysolen tannophilus and Yarrowia lipolytica. These organisms exhibit considerable potential; producing ethanol and 1,3-butanediol (P. tannophilus) and organic acids, lipids and polyols (Y. lipolytica). In addition to their product range the strains are also capable of converting carbon sources found in a range of sustainable feedstocks.

AB - The demands of modern society are increasing pressure on natural resources while creating the need for a wider range of products. There is an interest in developing bioprocesses to meet these demands, with conversion of a variety of waste materials providing the basis for a sustainable society. The application of biological catalysts which can convert a variety of substrates to an array of<br/>desirable products has been demonstrated in both ancient bioprocesses and modern industrial biotechnology. In recent times, focus has been on a limited number of “model” organisms which have been extensively exploited and developed. Systems biology approaches can be applied with these well studied strains, where considerable physiological data has been obtained, genome sequences are known and genetic tools have been developed. With the necessity of considering a wider array of substrates and the need for new types of products, it may be interesting to look to less domesticated strains and towards more non-conventional hosts in the development of new bioprocesses. This approach demands thorough physiological characterization as well as establishment of tools for genetic engineering if new cell factories are to be exploited through application of systems biology tools. Here two potential cell factories for the conversion of glycerol are described: Pachysolen tannophilus and Yarrowia lipolytica. These organisms exhibit considerable potential; producing ethanol and 1,3-butanediol (P. tannophilus) and organic acids, lipids and polyols (Y. lipolytica). In addition to their product range the strains are also capable of converting carbon sources found in a range of sustainable feedstocks.

U2 - 10.1016/j.nbt.2012.08.211

DO - 10.1016/j.nbt.2012.08.211

JO - New Biotechnology

JF - New Biotechnology

SN - 1871-6784

VL - 29S

SP - S75

ER -