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Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil. / Sørensen, P.

In: Biology and Fertility of Soils, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1998, p. 85-91.

Publication: ResearchJournal article – Annual report year: 1998

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Sørensen, P. / Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil.

In: Biology and Fertility of Soils, Vol. 27, No. 1, 1998, p. 85-91.

Publication: ResearchJournal article – Annual report year: 1998

Bibtex

@article{088133395a7b475caeb56f0258be1c56,
title = "Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil",
keywords = "Planteproduktion og stofomsætning",
publisher = "Springer",
author = "P. Sørensen",
year = "1998",
doi = "10.1007/s003740050404",
volume = "27",
number = "1",
pages = "85--91",
journal = "Biology and Fertility of Soils",
issn = "0178-2762",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil

A1 - Sørensen,P.

AU - Sørensen,P.

PB - Springer

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Animal slurries are stored for a variable period of time before application in the field. The effect of cattle slurry storage time and temperature on the subsequent mineralization of C and N in soil was studied under laboratory conditions. Urine and faeces from a dairy cow were sampled separately and mixed to a slurry. After 4 weeks of storage under anaerobic conditions at 15 degrees C, the NH4+ N content exceeded the original urinary N content of the slurry; the NH4+ content increased only slightly during the following 16 weeks of storage. After 4 weeks of storage, the proportion of slurry C in volatile fatty acids (VFA) amounted to 10% and increased to 15% after 20 weeks. Straw addition to the slurry caused an increase of VFA-C in stored slurry, but had a negligible influence on the proportion of slurry N in the form of NH4+. Slurries subjected to different storage conditions were added to a sandy and a sandy loam soil. After 1 week, the preceding storage period (0-20 weeks) and temperature (5 degrees C or 15 degrees C) had no significant effect on the net release of inorganic N from the slurry in soil. Thus, the increased NH4+ content in the slurry after storage was followed by increased net N immobilization in soil. Additional straw in the slurry caused increased net N immobilization only in the sandy loam soil. Following anaerobic storage, 8-14% of slurry C was released in gaseous form, and the net mineralization of slurry C after 12 weeks in soil amounted to 54-63%. The extra net mineralization of C in soil due to straw in slurry was equivalent to 76% of straw C, suggesting that the straw accelerated the mineralization of C derived from faeces, urine and/or soil.

AB - Animal slurries are stored for a variable period of time before application in the field. The effect of cattle slurry storage time and temperature on the subsequent mineralization of C and N in soil was studied under laboratory conditions. Urine and faeces from a dairy cow were sampled separately and mixed to a slurry. After 4 weeks of storage under anaerobic conditions at 15 degrees C, the NH4+ N content exceeded the original urinary N content of the slurry; the NH4+ content increased only slightly during the following 16 weeks of storage. After 4 weeks of storage, the proportion of slurry C in volatile fatty acids (VFA) amounted to 10% and increased to 15% after 20 weeks. Straw addition to the slurry caused an increase of VFA-C in stored slurry, but had a negligible influence on the proportion of slurry N in the form of NH4+. Slurries subjected to different storage conditions were added to a sandy and a sandy loam soil. After 1 week, the preceding storage period (0-20 weeks) and temperature (5 degrees C or 15 degrees C) had no significant effect on the net release of inorganic N from the slurry in soil. Thus, the increased NH4+ content in the slurry after storage was followed by increased net N immobilization in soil. Additional straw in the slurry caused increased net N immobilization only in the sandy loam soil. Following anaerobic storage, 8-14% of slurry C was released in gaseous form, and the net mineralization of slurry C after 12 weeks in soil amounted to 54-63%. The extra net mineralization of C in soil due to straw in slurry was equivalent to 76% of straw C, suggesting that the straw accelerated the mineralization of C derived from faeces, urine and/or soil.

KW - Planteproduktion og stofomsætning

U2 - 10.1007/s003740050404

DO - 10.1007/s003740050404

JO - Biology and Fertility of Soils

JF - Biology and Fertility of Soils

SN - 0178-2762

IS - 1

VL - 27

SP - 85

EP - 91

ER -