DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

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DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications. / Reisner, Walter ; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Austin, Robert H .

In: Reports on Progress in Physics, Vol. 75, No. 10, 2012.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

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Reisner, Walter ; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Austin, Robert H / DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications.

In: Reports on Progress in Physics, Vol. 75, No. 10, 2012.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

Bibtex

@article{a96b2026d45e4e958dcc52a5a2b48488,
title = "DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications",
publisher = "Institute of Physics Publishing",
author = "Walter Reisner and Pedersen, {Jonas Nyvold} and Austin, {Robert H}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1088/0034-4885/75/10/106601",
volume = "75",
number = "10",
journal = "Reports on Progress in Physics",
issn = "0034-4885",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - DNA confinement in nanochannels: physics and biological applications

A1 - Reisner,Walter

A1 - Pedersen,Jonas Nyvold

A1 - Austin,Robert H

AU - Reisner,Walter

AU - Pedersen,Jonas Nyvold

AU - Austin,Robert H

PB - Institute of Physics Publishing

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - DNA is the central storage molecule of genetic information in the cell, and reading that information is a central<br/>problem in biology. While sequencing technology has made enormous advances over the past decade, there is<br/>growing interest in platforms that can readout genetic information directly from long single DNA molecules,<br/>with the ultimate goal of single-cell, single-genome analysis. Such a capability would obviate the need for<br/>ensemble averaging over heterogeneous cellular populations and eliminate uncertainties introduced by cloning<br/>and molecular amplification steps (thus enabling direct assessment of the genome in its native state). In this<br/>review, we will discuss how the information contained in genomic-length single DNA molecules can be<br/>accessed via physical confinement in nanochannels. Due to self-avoidance interactions, DNA molecules will<br/>stretch out when confined in nanochannels, creating a linear unscrolling of the genome along the channel for<br/>analysis. We will first review the fundamental physics of DNA nanochannel confinement—including the effect<br/>of varying ionic strength—and then discuss recent applications of these systems to genomic mapping. Apart<br/>from the intense biological interest in extracting linear sequence information from elongated DNA molecules,<br/>from a physics view these systems are fascinating as they enable probing of single-molecule conformation in<br/>environments with dimensions that intersect key physical length-scales in the 1 nm to 100μm range.<br/>(Some figures may appear in colour only in the online journal)

AB - DNA is the central storage molecule of genetic information in the cell, and reading that information is a central<br/>problem in biology. While sequencing technology has made enormous advances over the past decade, there is<br/>growing interest in platforms that can readout genetic information directly from long single DNA molecules,<br/>with the ultimate goal of single-cell, single-genome analysis. Such a capability would obviate the need for<br/>ensemble averaging over heterogeneous cellular populations and eliminate uncertainties introduced by cloning<br/>and molecular amplification steps (thus enabling direct assessment of the genome in its native state). In this<br/>review, we will discuss how the information contained in genomic-length single DNA molecules can be<br/>accessed via physical confinement in nanochannels. Due to self-avoidance interactions, DNA molecules will<br/>stretch out when confined in nanochannels, creating a linear unscrolling of the genome along the channel for<br/>analysis. We will first review the fundamental physics of DNA nanochannel confinement—including the effect<br/>of varying ionic strength—and then discuss recent applications of these systems to genomic mapping. Apart<br/>from the intense biological interest in extracting linear sequence information from elongated DNA molecules,<br/>from a physics view these systems are fascinating as they enable probing of single-molecule conformation in<br/>environments with dimensions that intersect key physical length-scales in the 1 nm to 100μm range.<br/>(Some figures may appear in colour only in the online journal)

U2 - 10.1088/0034-4885/75/10/106601

DO - 10.1088/0034-4885/75/10/106601

JO - Reports on Progress in Physics

JF - Reports on Progress in Physics

SN - 0034-4885

IS - 10

VL - 75

ER -