Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2009

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@article{fa6f82c231bf4e0c84ccb98a2f5afeed,
title = "Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men",
keywords = "Body mass index, obesity, overweight, socioeconomic position, socioeconomic status",
author = "Groth, {Margit Velsing} and Sisse Fagt and Anders Stockmarr and Jeppe Matthiessen and Biltoft-Jensen, {Anja Pia}",
year = "2009",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1177/1403494809105284",
volume = "37",
pages = "418--426",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1403-4948",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men

AU - Groth,Margit Velsing

AU - Fagt,Sisse

AU - Stockmarr,Anders

AU - Matthiessen,Jeppe

AU - Biltoft-Jensen,Anja Pia

PY - 2009/6

Y1 - 2009/6

N2 - Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the association between different dimensions of socioeconomic position, bodymass index (BMI) and obesity in the Danish population. Possible interactions between the different dimensions and genderdifferences were also investigated. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2000–2002 including a simplerandom sample from the civil registration system, comprising 1953 males and 2167 females aged 4–75 years. Informationabout different dimensions of socioeconomic position, height and weight was obtained by face-to-face interview. Associationsbetween dimensions of socioeconomic position and weight status were examined by use of linear multiple regressionanalysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: BMI and prevalence of obesity were significantly associated with educationfor both men and women. Odds ratios (ORs) for obesity were 2.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.9) and 6.5 (95% CI2.3–18.7) for those with basic school as compared with those with long higher education for men and women, respectively.Women outside the labour market had higher BMIs and a greater prevalence of obesity (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.6–3.9))after adjustment for educational level. Conclusions: Education was the dimension most consistently associated withBMI and obesity, indicating the importance of cultural capital for weight status. The gender-specific patternshowed a stronger social gradient for women, and indicated that a high relative body weight was associatedwith less favourable social and material conditions for women, but not for men. A public health strategy toprevent and reduce obesity should be gender-specific, focus on groups with short education, and incorporatecultural norms.

AB - Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the association between different dimensions of socioeconomic position, bodymass index (BMI) and obesity in the Danish population. Possible interactions between the different dimensions and genderdifferences were also investigated. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2000–2002 including a simplerandom sample from the civil registration system, comprising 1953 males and 2167 females aged 4–75 years. Informationabout different dimensions of socioeconomic position, height and weight was obtained by face-to-face interview. Associationsbetween dimensions of socioeconomic position and weight status were examined by use of linear multiple regressionanalysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: BMI and prevalence of obesity were significantly associated with educationfor both men and women. Odds ratios (ORs) for obesity were 2.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.9) and 6.5 (95% CI2.3–18.7) for those with basic school as compared with those with long higher education for men and women, respectively.Women outside the labour market had higher BMIs and a greater prevalence of obesity (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.6–3.9))after adjustment for educational level. Conclusions: Education was the dimension most consistently associated withBMI and obesity, indicating the importance of cultural capital for weight status. The gender-specific patternshowed a stronger social gradient for women, and indicated that a high relative body weight was associatedwith less favourable social and material conditions for women, but not for men. A public health strategy toprevent and reduce obesity should be gender-specific, focus on groups with short education, and incorporatecultural norms.

KW - Body mass index

KW - obesity

KW - overweight

KW - socioeconomic position

KW - socioeconomic status

U2 - 10.1177/1403494809105284

DO - 10.1177/1403494809105284

M3 - Journal article

VL - 37

SP - 418

EP - 426

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

T2 - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - 4

ER -