Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2009

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@article{fa6f82c231bf4e0c84ccb98a2f5afeed,
title = "Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men",
publisher = "Sage Science Press (UK)",
author = "Groth, {Margit Velsing} and Sisse Fagt and Anders Stockmarr and Jeppe Matthiessen and Biltoft-Jensen, {Anja Pia}",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1177/1403494809105284",
volume = "37",
number = "4",
pages = "418--426",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Public Health",
issn = "1403-4948",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dimensions of socioeconomic position related to body mass index and obesity among Danish women and men

A1 - Groth,Margit Velsing

A1 - Fagt,Sisse

A1 - Stockmarr,Anders

A1 - Matthiessen,Jeppe

A1 - Biltoft-Jensen,Anja Pia

AU - Groth,Margit Velsing

AU - Fagt,Sisse

AU - Stockmarr,Anders

AU - Matthiessen,Jeppe

AU - Biltoft-Jensen,Anja Pia

PB - Sage Science Press (UK)

PY - 2009/6

Y1 - 2009/6

N2 - Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the association between different dimensions of socioeconomic position, body<br/>mass index (BMI) and obesity in the Danish population. Possible interactions between the different dimensions and gender<br/>differences were also investigated. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2000–2002 including a simple<br/>random sample from the civil registration system, comprising 1953 males and 2167 females aged 4–75 years. Information<br/>about different dimensions of socioeconomic position, height and weight was obtained by face-to-face interview. Associations<br/>between dimensions of socioeconomic position and weight status were examined by use of linear multiple regression<br/>analysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: BMI and prevalence of obesity were significantly associated with education<br/>for both men and women. Odds ratios (ORs) for obesity were 2.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.9) and 6.5 (95% CI<br/>2.3–18.7) for those with basic school as compared with those with long higher education for men and women, respectively.<br/>Women outside the labour market had higher BMIs and a greater prevalence of obesity (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.6–3.9))<br/>after adjustment for educational level. Conclusions: Education was the dimension most consistently associated with<br/>BMI and obesity, indicating the importance of cultural capital for weight status. The gender-specific pattern<br/>showed a stronger social gradient for women, and indicated that a high relative body weight was associated<br/>with less favourable social and material conditions for women, but not for men. A public health strategy to<br/>prevent and reduce obesity should be gender-specific, focus on groups with short education, and incorporate<br/>cultural norms.

AB - Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the association between different dimensions of socioeconomic position, body<br/>mass index (BMI) and obesity in the Danish population. Possible interactions between the different dimensions and gender<br/>differences were also investigated. Methods: This was a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2000–2002 including a simple<br/>random sample from the civil registration system, comprising 1953 males and 2167 females aged 4–75 years. Information<br/>about different dimensions of socioeconomic position, height and weight was obtained by face-to-face interview. Associations<br/>between dimensions of socioeconomic position and weight status were examined by use of linear multiple regression<br/>analysis and logistic regression analysis. Results: BMI and prevalence of obesity were significantly associated with education<br/>for both men and women. Odds ratios (ORs) for obesity were 2.9 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4–5.9) and 6.5 (95% CI<br/>2.3–18.7) for those with basic school as compared with those with long higher education for men and women, respectively.<br/>Women outside the labour market had higher BMIs and a greater prevalence of obesity (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.6–3.9))<br/>after adjustment for educational level. Conclusions: Education was the dimension most consistently associated with<br/>BMI and obesity, indicating the importance of cultural capital for weight status. The gender-specific pattern<br/>showed a stronger social gradient for women, and indicated that a high relative body weight was associated<br/>with less favourable social and material conditions for women, but not for men. A public health strategy to<br/>prevent and reduce obesity should be gender-specific, focus on groups with short education, and incorporate<br/>cultural norms.

KW - Body mass index

KW - obesity

KW - overweight

KW - socioeconomic position

KW - socioeconomic status

U2 - 10.1177/1403494809105284

DO - 10.1177/1403494809105284

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Public Health

SN - 1403-4948

IS - 4

VL - 37

SP - 418

EP - 426

ER -