Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

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Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish. / Jepsen, Niels; Deacon, Michael; Koed, Anders.

In: Endangered Species Research, Vol. 16, 2012, p. 77-84.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

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Author

Jepsen, Niels; Deacon, Michael; Koed, Anders / Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish.

In: Endangered Species Research, Vol. 16, 2012, p. 77-84.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

Bibtex

@article{6dff6f9229c743c19ba4d6ae70a4005f,
title = "Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish",
author = "Niels Jepsen and Michael Deacon and Anders Koed",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3354/esr00386",
volume = "16",
pages = "77--84",
journal = "Endangered Species Research",
issn = "1863-5407",
publisher = "Inter Research",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish

AU - Jepsen,Niels

AU - Deacon,Michael

AU - Koed,Anders

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Once an abundant fish species in the rivers of the Wadden Sea in northwest Europe, <br/>the North Sea houting Coregonus oxyrinchus (NSH) was at the brink of extinction 25 yr ago. The <br/>very last stronghold for this species was in the small Danish River Vidaa. In an attempt to preserve <br/>this anadromous whitefish species, juveniles were hatchery-reared and stocked in 6 Danish rivers <br/>flowing into the Wadden Sea. These stocking efforts were fairly successful, and the houting established <br/>populations in at least 2 of the rivers, but the underlying problem of habitat degradation and <br/>migration obstacles was not solved. Since a national management plan was issued in Denmark in <br/>2003, large-scale river restoration measures have been undertaken, including the removal of 13 <br/>large obstacles in 3 NSH rivers and reestablishment of meanders in the lower river reaches. These <br/>measures were all intended to increase the spawning area for NSH and reduce juvenile mortality <br/>of NSH. The generic effect of these recent and ongoing changes is, however, not yet known. The <br/>NSH population has been irregularly monitored under various programs. Results from 15 yr of <br/>field investigation using passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagging showed that the NSH population <br/>in the River Vidaa remains stable, but in the other 2 rivers populations are decreasing. <br/>However, due to the recent physical improvements in river habitat and connectivity, we expect a <br/>substantial improvement in the population status of the NSH in the near future. Once they reach <br/>sexual maturity, NSH grow relatively slowly (mean: 2.55 cm yr−1, ranging from 0 to 13.8 cm yr−1) <br/>and can reach an age of 10 to 12 yr. The number of repeated recaptures year after year indicates <br/>low mortality for adult fish. Six individuals were recaptured in rivers other than the one in which <br/>they were initially PIT-tagged, indicating some exchange/straying between adjacent rivers. Overall <br/>there is a good chance that this unique species was saved in the 11th hour by intervention from <br/>managers and the EU

AB - Once an abundant fish species in the rivers of the Wadden Sea in northwest Europe, <br/>the North Sea houting Coregonus oxyrinchus (NSH) was at the brink of extinction 25 yr ago. The <br/>very last stronghold for this species was in the small Danish River Vidaa. In an attempt to preserve <br/>this anadromous whitefish species, juveniles were hatchery-reared and stocked in 6 Danish rivers <br/>flowing into the Wadden Sea. These stocking efforts were fairly successful, and the houting established <br/>populations in at least 2 of the rivers, but the underlying problem of habitat degradation and <br/>migration obstacles was not solved. Since a national management plan was issued in Denmark in <br/>2003, large-scale river restoration measures have been undertaken, including the removal of 13 <br/>large obstacles in 3 NSH rivers and reestablishment of meanders in the lower river reaches. These <br/>measures were all intended to increase the spawning area for NSH and reduce juvenile mortality <br/>of NSH. The generic effect of these recent and ongoing changes is, however, not yet known. The <br/>NSH population has been irregularly monitored under various programs. Results from 15 yr of <br/>field investigation using passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagging showed that the NSH population <br/>in the River Vidaa remains stable, but in the other 2 rivers populations are decreasing. <br/>However, due to the recent physical improvements in river habitat and connectivity, we expect a <br/>substantial improvement in the population status of the NSH in the near future. Once they reach <br/>sexual maturity, NSH grow relatively slowly (mean: 2.55 cm yr−1, ranging from 0 to 13.8 cm yr−1) <br/>and can reach an age of 10 to 12 yr. The number of repeated recaptures year after year indicates <br/>low mortality for adult fish. Six individuals were recaptured in rivers other than the one in which <br/>they were initially PIT-tagged, indicating some exchange/straying between adjacent rivers. Overall <br/>there is a good chance that this unique species was saved in the 11th hour by intervention from <br/>managers and the EU

U2 - 10.3354/esr00386

DO - 10.3354/esr00386

M3 - Journal article

VL - 16

SP - 77

EP - 84

JO - Endangered Species Research

T2 - Endangered Species Research

JF - Endangered Species Research

SN - 1863-5407

ER -