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@article{5222bd87a26b48c5adc173bd131425bd,
title = "Comparing ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills for an asphaltenic, a waxy and a light crude oil as a function of weathering conditions under arctic conditions",
keywords = "In situ burning, Crude oils, Weathering, Oil spill, Arctic, Laboratory experiments",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
author = "Janne Fritt-Rasmussen and Brandvik, {Per Johan} and Arne Villumsen and Stenby, {Erling Halfdan}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.coldregions.2011.12.001",
volume = "72",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "Cold Regions Science and Technology",
issn = "0165-232X",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparing ignitability for in situ burning of oil spills for an asphaltenic, a waxy and a light crude oil as a function of weathering conditions under arctic conditions

A1 - Fritt-Rasmussen,Janne

A1 - Brandvik,Per Johan

A1 - Villumsen,Arne

A1 - Stenby,Erling Halfdan

AU - Fritt-Rasmussen,Janne

AU - Brandvik,Per Johan

AU - Villumsen,Arne

AU - Stenby,Erling Halfdan

PB - Elsevier BV

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - In situ burning of oil spills in the Arctic is a promising countermeasure. In spite of the research already conducted more knowledge is needed especially regarding burning of weathered oils. This paper uses a new laboratory burning cell (100 mL sample) to test three Norwegian crude oils, Grane (asphalthenic), Kobbe (light oil) and Norne (waxy), for ignitability as a function of ice conditions and weathering degree. The crude oils (9 L) were weathered in a laboratory basin (4.8 m3) under simulated arctic conditions (0, 50 and 90% ice cover). The laboratory burning tests show that the ignitability is dependent on oil composition, ice conditions and weathering degree. In open water, oil spills rapidly become “not ignitable” due to the weathering e.g. high water content and low content of residual volatile components. The slower weathering of oil spills in ice (50 and 90% ice cover) results in longer time-windows for the oil to be ignitable. The composition of the oils is important for the window of opportunity. The asphalthenic Grane crude oil had a limited timewindow for in situ burning (9 h or less), while the light Kobbe crude oil and the waxy Norne crude oil had the longest time-windows for in situ burning (from 18 h to more than 72 h). Such information regarding time windows for using in situ burning is very important for both contingency planning and operational use of in situ burning.

AB - In situ burning of oil spills in the Arctic is a promising countermeasure. In spite of the research already conducted more knowledge is needed especially regarding burning of weathered oils. This paper uses a new laboratory burning cell (100 mL sample) to test three Norwegian crude oils, Grane (asphalthenic), Kobbe (light oil) and Norne (waxy), for ignitability as a function of ice conditions and weathering degree. The crude oils (9 L) were weathered in a laboratory basin (4.8 m3) under simulated arctic conditions (0, 50 and 90% ice cover). The laboratory burning tests show that the ignitability is dependent on oil composition, ice conditions and weathering degree. In open water, oil spills rapidly become “not ignitable” due to the weathering e.g. high water content and low content of residual volatile components. The slower weathering of oil spills in ice (50 and 90% ice cover) results in longer time-windows for the oil to be ignitable. The composition of the oils is important for the window of opportunity. The asphalthenic Grane crude oil had a limited timewindow for in situ burning (9 h or less), while the light Kobbe crude oil and the waxy Norne crude oil had the longest time-windows for in situ burning (from 18 h to more than 72 h). Such information regarding time windows for using in situ burning is very important for both contingency planning and operational use of in situ burning.

KW - In situ burning

KW - Crude oils

KW - Weathering

KW - Oil spill

KW - Arctic

KW - Laboratory experiments

U2 - 10.1016/j.coldregions.2011.12.001

DO - 10.1016/j.coldregions.2011.12.001

JO - Cold Regions Science and Technology

JF - Cold Regions Science and Technology

SN - 0165-232X

VL - 72

SP - 1

EP - 6

ER -