Attributing the Human Disease Burden of Foodborne Infections to Specific Sources

Publication: Research - peer-reviewReview – Annual report year: 2009

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DOI

  • Author: Pires, Sara Monteiro

    Division of Microbiology and Risk Assessment, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, 2860, Søborg, Denmark

  • Author: Evers, Eric E.

    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The, Laboratory of Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology

  • Author: Van Pely, Wilfrid

    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The, Epidemiology and Surveillance Unit

  • Author: Ayers, Tracy

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, National Center for Zoonotic, Vectorborne,

  • Author: Scallan, Elain

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, National Center for Zoonotic, Vectorborne,

  • Author: Angulo, Frederick J.

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, National Center for Zoonotic, Vectorborne,

  • Author: Havelaar, Arie

    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The, Laboratory of Zoonoses and Environmental Microbiology

  • Author: Hald, Tine

    Division of Microbiology and Risk Assessment, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Mørkhøj Bygade 19, 2860, Søborg, Denmark

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Foodborne diseases are an important cause of human illness worldwide. Humans acquire these infections from a variety of sources and routes of transmission. Many efforts have been made in the last decades to prevent and control foodborne diseases, particularly foodborne zoonoses. However, information on the impact of these interventions is limited. To identify and prioritize successful food safety interventions, it is important to attribute the burden of human illness to the specific sources. Defining scientific concepts and harmonizing terminology for ‘‘source attribution’’ is essential for understanding and improving attribution methodologies and for sharing knowledge within the scientific community. We propose harmonized nomenclature, and describe the various approaches for human illness source attribution and their usefulness to address specific public health questions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
Publication dateMay 2009
Volume6
Issue4
Pages417-424
ISSN1535-3141
DOIs
StatePublished
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 59

Keywords

  • Zoonoses, Source Attribution, Foodborne
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