A workplace feasibility study of the effect of a minimal fruit intervention on fruit intake

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2010

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{ff4b8a4f04a04616b7040aa164746565,
title = "A workplace feasibility study of the effect of a minimal fruit intervention on fruit intake",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
author = "Sevil Alinia and Lassen, {Anne Dahl} and Krogholm, {Kirstine Suszkiewicz} and Tue Christensen and Ole Hels and Inge Tetens",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1017/S1368980010002569",
volume = "14",
number = "8",
pages = "1382--1387",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A workplace feasibility study of the effect of a minimal fruit intervention on fruit intake

A1 - Alinia,Sevil

A1 - Lassen,Anne Dahl

A1 - Krogholm,Kirstine Suszkiewicz

A1 - Christensen,Tue

A1 - Hels,Ole

A1 - Tetens,Inge

AU - Alinia,Sevil

AU - Lassen,Anne Dahl

AU - Krogholm,Kirstine Suszkiewicz

AU - Christensen,Tue

AU - Hels,Ole

AU - Tetens,Inge

PB - Cambridge University Press

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Objective: The main purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using workplaces to increase the fruit consumption of participants by increasing fruit availability and accessibility by a minimal fruit programme. Furthermore, it was investigated whether a potential increase in fruit intake would affect vegetable, total energy and nutrient intake. Design: A 5-month, controlled, workplace study where workplaces were divided into an intervention group (IG) and a control group (CG). At least one piece of free fruit was available per person per day in the IG. Total fruit and dietary intake was assessed, using two 24 h dietary recalls at baseline and at endpoint. Setting: Eight Danish workplaces were enrolled in the study. Five workplaces were in the IG and three were in the CG. Subjects: One hundred and twenty-four (IG, n 68; CG, n 56) healthy, mainly normal-weight participants were recruited. Results: Mean daily fruit intake increased significantly from baseline to endpoint only in the IG by 112 (SE 35) g. In the IG, mean daily intake of added sugar decreased significantly by 10?7 (SE 4?4) g, whereas mean daily intake of dietary fibre increased significantly by 3?0 (SE 1?1) g. Vegetable, total energy and macronutrient intake remained unchanged through the intervention period for both groups. Conclusions: The present study showed that it is feasible to increase the average fruit intake at workplaces by simply increasing fruit availability and accessibility. Increased fruit intake possibly substituted intake of foods containing added sugar. In this study population the increased fruit intake did not affect total energy intake.

AB - Objective: The main purpose of the study was to investigate the feasibility of using workplaces to increase the fruit consumption of participants by increasing fruit availability and accessibility by a minimal fruit programme. Furthermore, it was investigated whether a potential increase in fruit intake would affect vegetable, total energy and nutrient intake. Design: A 5-month, controlled, workplace study where workplaces were divided into an intervention group (IG) and a control group (CG). At least one piece of free fruit was available per person per day in the IG. Total fruit and dietary intake was assessed, using two 24 h dietary recalls at baseline and at endpoint. Setting: Eight Danish workplaces were enrolled in the study. Five workplaces were in the IG and three were in the CG. Subjects: One hundred and twenty-four (IG, n 68; CG, n 56) healthy, mainly normal-weight participants were recruited. Results: Mean daily fruit intake increased significantly from baseline to endpoint only in the IG by 112 (SE 35) g. In the IG, mean daily intake of added sugar decreased significantly by 10?7 (SE 4?4) g, whereas mean daily intake of dietary fibre increased significantly by 3?0 (SE 1?1) g. Vegetable, total energy and macronutrient intake remained unchanged through the intervention period for both groups. Conclusions: The present study showed that it is feasible to increase the average fruit intake at workplaces by simply increasing fruit availability and accessibility. Increased fruit intake possibly substituted intake of foods containing added sugar. In this study population the increased fruit intake did not affect total energy intake.

KW - Dietary intervention

KW - Fruit intake

KW - Dietary change

U2 - 10.1017/S1368980010002569

DO - 10.1017/S1368980010002569

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 8

VL - 14

SP - 1382

EP - 1387

ER -